EDU-BLOODY-CATION

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Re: EDU-BLOODY-CATION

Postby nunya » Thu Jul 24, 2008 4:47 pm

Thanks C'mon. I don't operate machinery because we mostly do house additions and renovations, but I have pretty much done everything there is to do. It's kind of wierd because there are laws against it :? (you have to be 18 for most of them). But there are many things I learn just from showing up. It's funny that you should say your son wants to take over the business because I keep thinking to myself that there are so many things I could do better than my dad. The reason I say that is because he's a very belligerent person when it comes to work, and he doesn't usually care how aesthetically pleasing the outcome is. He's always mad at workers that he hires for the wierdest reasons (he's unwilling to teach... which I don't understand). And he's also bad at communicating because English is his 4rth language. I don't know if everybody wants to correct their father's mistakes but if I had a reason to continue the business then it would be this.
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Re: EDU-BLOODY-CATION

Postby C'mon » Fri Jul 25, 2008 2:13 am

My son says that he wants to carry this on because he enjoys it. I thought that but I had to check after reading Nunya's post. We don't always see eye to eye but for the most part we get along quite well. He is usually on my case for being "too anal" and an "annoying perfectionist"...if that's the worst he ever calls me I'm OK with it. :lol: Nunya, is it required that your Dad speaks English? If it is I cannot imagine his frustration...at least at times. To have to think something, then translate it in your head and then speak it in a way that people know what you need from them would be daunting. Maybe this makes him seem a little less charming at times? Also, I know from my experience, we (Dads) expect more from our sons and they (sons) sometimes get pushed harder than the next guy. Obviously I don't know you or your Dad but I can speak from my experience working with my son...it takes mutual respect and comprimise...and sometimes it takes staying out of each other's way. :roll: It's certainly not perfect in a gooy "Brady Bunch" kinda way with us but we work at it and it works.
Back to education, though. When my son finishes high school, even if he still intends to stay with the family biz, I insist that he further his education. Make it a related trade, make it something from another interest, but have something to fall back on at the very least. So far he hasn't shown any interest or aptitude for university and that's fine with me but there are trades, business courses and a whole world of stuff out there. He agrees with me on this point (thank Gawd) and will do it. I should also point out that I'm not saying that he's not smart. Just the opposite, he's one of the most clever people I've ever met...just not in a "doctor" or "pharmasist" kinda way.
Enjoy workin' with your Dad...it can be a cool time of your life.
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Re: EDU-BLOODY-CATION

Postby nunya » Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:48 am

Yes, it's required for him to speak English. He has to talk to customers and be sort of a salesperson. It's just frustrating for me because I think he's a very intelligent, and when he speaks English it shows he doesn't have a clear grasp of what he's really trying to say. He makes many childish mistakes and I fear that if people see only this side of him then they might think it reflects on his effort to do work. Many people are even willing to pay extra to avoid a contractor who can't communicate well. It's sad because he was an electric before we came to America and all his credentials didn't matter. He had to start out from the bottom and the reputation that he built stayed with the other company. He wasn't getting paid much working for others, (his boss even used to brag that he paid him less than Mexicans) even though he was the foreman, so he decided to start his own business. As you can see, he has no other choice then to be the salesperson. I guess I expect too much from him. His age is probably a factor and I can't expect him to be perfect. But what I can do, is learn from whatever mistakes he makes and try to avoid them. Working with him has taught me not to judge people in one area and expect them to be the same in their effort at everything else. And most importantly, working with my dad has taught me tolerance.

I think it's great that your son enjoys your job. Many people are so blinded by money and material needs that they wake up every day hating what they do. As long as something makes you happy then it's worth pursuing. Not many people have this option but those who do should appreciate it because the salary doesn't prove you're successful at life. By the way, I picked pharmacy not because of the pay but just because I enjoy it, and I also get a chance to use something to help others ( not just as a job but whenever I can volunteer). As clichéd as that sounded, I really do think about people who suffer all around the world.

I think that life is an educational process and that everybody has their strengths. It's not just your ability to memorize lengthy books that distinguishes you as an extraordinary human being.
Last edited by nunya on Sat Jul 26, 2008 3:01 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: EDU-BLOODY-CATION

Postby Johngo4 » Sat Jul 26, 2008 12:31 am

Well, I come from five generations of doctors, and no matter what they offer me, I really don't want to go in to medicine like my father is. Don't get me wrong, I like my father and respect what he does, but medicine is not what I want to do. Admittedly, my shortlist of possible careers numbers in the 30s (or more) but medicine isn't on there. I suppose it's just a matter of different intrests. In any case, I have a small horde of younger siblings and at least one of them will probably carry on the tradition. And I agree with Nunya's point about careers, if you don't enjoy what you do, no matter how much you get paid, you'll find it difficult to lead a fufilling life. And if any of you tell me I'm too young to start worrying about this, you can well and truly F off.
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Re: EDU-BLOODY-CATION

Postby C'mon » Sat Jul 26, 2008 3:06 am

Tsk,tsk,tsk....that's not very nice John. Worry 'til yer head explodes if ya want. I guess I'm lucky...money's great and I love what I do. Took some trial and error to get here, though.
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